The Lord's Supper

10.31.15 Sorry I missed my blog last night but Ernest and I decided to turn in early and it felt good to get the extra sleep. Today @ Church we took part in the Lord's supper and I would like to talk a little bit about that today. 
Communion uses bread as a symbol for Jesus’ body and wine or a lot of Churches use grape juice as a symbol for His blood. Yes, it sounds strange. But why do Christians talk about eating Jesus’ body and drinking His blood?
Jesus started the tradition of communion. He instructed His followers to use bread and wine to remember the sacrifice He was going to make when He died for our sins on the cross (1 Corinthians 11:23-26).
Jesus called Himself “the bread of life,” which means that we’re nourished by Him, we survive because of Him, and He satisfies us when everything else leaves us empty (John 6:48-51). There’s a connection between our nearness to Jesus, believing in Him, and being fulfilled by Him (John 6:35).
The early Church celebrated Jesus by taking communion, sometimes every day (Acts 2:42-46). They saw that every time they gathered around a table to eat and drink, it was a chance to recognize Jesus and thank God for all He’s done.
Taking communion doesn’t make you a Christian. It doesn’t save your soul or get you to heaven. God actually warns us about taking communion without considering what it means and why we’re doing it. The intent is not for us to mindlessly perform a ritual, but to intentionally set aside time to remember what Jesus has done and why He did it (1 Corinthians 11:27-31).

Charles Stanley said: Jesus’ last meal with His disciples took place during the celebration of Passover. Giving them bread, He said, “Take, eat; this is My body.” Next, offering wine from a shared cup, He told them, “Drink from it, all of you; for this is My blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for forgiveness of sins” (Matthew 26:26-28). Believers today observe the Lord’s Supper as a symbol of cleansing, consecration, and communion.
Jesus’ blood cleanses us of sin. Starting with Adam and Eve, God required a blood sacrifice to cover transgressions (Genesis 3:21; Leviticus 17:11). But this was just a temporary solution, as the next offense required another sacrifice. Jesus was God’s permanent answer to the problem: He took upon Himself all sin - past, present, and future - and died to pay the full penalty.
When a believer receives salvation, he is consecrated - or set apart to the Lord. His sin is forgiven, and he receives eternal life as well as the indwelling Holy Spirit. But if he at times forgets that he belongs to the Lord, he may give in to temptation. The bread and the cup provide an opportunity to remember what the Father expects of His children and to renew one’s commitment to obey.
The Lord’s Supper is also a time to be in communion. We are connected not only with the Lord who saved us but also with past and present believers. Among members of God’s family, we find comfort and support, just as the disciples and the early church did.
The Lord’s Supper is a good time to stop and recall what Jesus has given us. Partake solemnly and gratefully.

So the next time you partake of the Lord's Supper take a minute and think about what the meaning is.

 

God I think You for giving Your Son so that I may live. I can't even imagine how that could've been for You to do that. I know for a fact I could never give up 1 of my kids for someone else. I wish I could say I could do that but I know for a fact besides for You my kids and husband are my life. Lord please be with my facebook family and friends and know I love You. I ask these things in Jesus Name Amen.

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